Category Archives: Honour boards

Remembering Ramsgate’s saddest week

On Sunday 19th March 1916 five enemy seaplanes raided Dover, Deal, Ramsgate &

Margate. In Ramsgate townsfolk heard heavy firing in the distance but it was

too misty to see much out at sea that afternoon. Suddenly the rapid firing of

shrapnel was heard then the sound of bombs exploding. Damage was done in King

Street and Chatham Street.

The driver of a motor car was struck and killed on St. Luke’s Avenue and most

of the windows in the vicinity were shattered. Five children were killed on

their way to St. Luke’s Sunday school and nine people were injured.

There will be a commemoration service at St Luke’s Church in Ramsgate on Sunday 20th March 2016 at 10.30am. All are welcome to attend. If fine the congregation will be invited to join a short walk to the cemetery to see the gravestone of the Saxby children which was restored in 2015.

 

Ten Ramsgate Communities and counting!

There are now ten Ramsgate communities on the IWM LivesoftheFirstWorldWar website. They are not complete yet. I have just added the Old Augustinians and the Old Laurentians and will be adding the Chatham House OBs and church honours boards too over the next few months. My guided cemetery tours are now finished for 2015 but nearly every time I learn something new. In August the grandson of a Ramsgate Buff who survived the Great War showed me where his grandfather is buried. An interesting twist is that Fred Elliss was a beach photographer before the war. My next quest is to find out if the honours board for the Ramsgate branch of the Ancient Order of Foresters still exists as I have a list from a local newspaper of a number of names which appeared on it.

St Lawrence College opened their doors for the first time last weekend as part of the national Heritage Open Days – a great opportunity to see their WW1 honours board in the chapel, which was itself built as a war memorial.

Ramsgate’s saddest week

On Sunday 19th March 1916 five enemy seaplanes raided Dover, Deal, Ramsgate &

Margate. In Ramsgate townsfolk heard heavy firing in the distance but it was

too misty to see much out at sea that afternoon. Suddenly the rapid firing of

shrapnel was heard then the sound of bombs exploding. Damage was done in King

Street and Chatham Street. Continue reading Ramsgate’s saddest week

Ramsgate added to IWM database

For the last two years I have been re-creating the Ramsgate Roll of Honour from the First World War. I am now starting to add the names very gradually to the IWM’s website

https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/

I am starting with the smaller groups such as those men who emigrated from Ramsgate, mainly to Canada or Australia. I have also added some men who served in the RFC/RAF. Have a look at my entries in the community ” RamsgateRemembers14-18″ and please let me know if you find any mistakes!

St Lawrence College Chapel

Good news for Ramsgate! The St Lawrence College chapel will be open to the public during the Heritage Open House weekend in September.

This will be a rare opportunity to see inside the Grade II listed Chapel at St Lawrence College which was built in 1926 by Sir Aston Webb as a war memorial to former pupils who lost their lives in the First World War.The original marble memorial plaque, unveiled in 1920, is at the heart of the Chapel and has subsequently been added to, bringing the total loss of pupils to 143.The chapel will be open on Saturday 12th September from 11am to 1pm. Visitors will be able to hear the Chapel organ being played and the Chaplain, Head of History and Senior School pupils will be on hand to  tell visitors more about the Chapel. This event will not be suitable for children under the age of 7.

http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/directory/st-lawrence-college-chapel

 

LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Ramsgate’s Roll of Honour from WW1 was lost during the Second World War so I am re-creating it in memory of my paternal grandfather who died in France in October 1918. If you go to St George’s Church in Ramsgate you will see the town’s war memorial in front of the main entrance but there are no names listed on it.There are, however, a number of plaques inside the church and other Roll of Honour boards still exist in local schools and churches. Not all the names listed have been found on the CWGC website so I have used local newspapers and street directories to find out more about the families. Stories about survivors are just as interesting. People move around a lot more these days so I have been surprised how many families still live locally a hundred years later. Continue reading LOST BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

What happened to it?

In the Thanet Advertiser and Echo of 13th July 1918 an article tells of the opportunity for townsfolk to visit the Ramsgate School of Art for a private view of the Roll of Honour, designed and made at the school out of oak by Mr G C Duxbury.

Above the names of two hundred and seventy men (up to that date) who died in the war was a circular picture of “St George standing high upon the shore, ridding the world of its scourge.” Mr Duxbury also had a sense of humour as if people looked carefully at the defeated dragon he was seen to be wearing a Pickelhaube, the spiked helmets worn by German officers. In the halo around the head of the town’s patron saint were the words of St George’s motto, “To defend the weak”.

Continue reading What happened to it?